DON STREET

DON STREET OFF LODGE ROAD the DON PUBLIC HOUSE ON ONE CORNER and BURT'S BARBERS SHOP ON THE OTHER

DON STREET18/05/07
Remembering the days of the Bookies,I recall the first one,he was the local milkman,name Mr Clackett from Peel St,he drove a pony & trap cart,delivering milk from a churn on one side a pint or quart,and placed your Bets in the other.In later years became licenced and opened betting shop in Foundry Road/James Turner Street corner.
The bookies in those days had lookouts,watching for the police,and I remember the day that they raid the bookies in our Don Street, I heard the lookout Wally Bright shout to the old lady the cops are coming. The police arrived in a open top car,and one of them was carrying a bucket,they called Mrs Peck open the doors,but she would not let them in, they smashed the door open to enter, with the old lady screaming leave me alone.
Later I found out the reason for the bucket, it was cement to seal up a letter box in the entry were people used to drop their bets in. The Bookmaker was named Ernie Hunter from Devonshire Streer.
Looking back it reminded me of the {The KeystoneCops} at the Saturday Morning Flicks
Once again happy times Best wishes to all on your Website
Colin Mills    

DON STREET.

I was born in Don Street  we lived right opposite a scrap yard, and on the corner was a pub called "The Don".The local sweet shop was just on Lodge Road called Goodacres any one remember it?  I also remember All Saints Hospital and recall the patients would at times jump over the wall to escape. The Recreation Ground (Rec) in Musgrave Road and the gully that lead to Talbot Street were places we played for many an hour.
I would love to here from anyone who knew me Janet Diane Hunt (nee Cantell)  

DON STREET 15/09/03                                                                                                            Does any one remember any McNallys that lived at 39 Don Street in the 50s they are relations and that was the last known adress we had, they are uncles of my mother who needs to make contact any info would be great  Siobhan Email: rosettiguinea1961@gmail.com  

The DON public house corner Don Street and Lodge Road and group of the Don's customers the man on extreme right of the group is Mr Alf Cratmail, he used to live with my mother, me and my sister Sheila at 16 Devonshire Street, he was known in the area as a tail biter, people used to bring their dog's to have the tail's nipped. (The Don photo from Mc Joseph)
Story and group photo from Roderick Scott   

                                                           LODGE ROAD  WITH DON STREET ON THE LEFT.

                                                           LODGE ROAD  WITH DON STREET ON THE LEFT.

          A GROUP OF CUSTOMERS FROM THE DON

DON STREET                                                                                                                                                                                        My name is Hazel Nunn (nee Clarke) I went to All Saints School and then onto Handworth New Road we lived at 22 Don Street. My mother (Ethel Cantell) opened a cafe in Bacchus Road 1957 - 1958. I have a brother Kenneth Cantell & sister Diane Cantell. I was friends with Ronald Smith "smudge" & Raymond Smith whose parents owned the pub on the corner of Don Street [THE DON].  Also, June Savory, Vera Tapp, Jean Whitehouse and Patricia Bailey. Would love to hear from any of them please Email: julie.nunn@ntlworld.com                                                                     

The pub opposite the asylum was called the "Don" it was on the corner of Don Street and Lodge Road near Chris Featherstones the butcher -Danny Clawley

DON STREET    19/01/04
I'd be very interested in anyone with any recollections of Harriet Heath who lived in Don Street.
I'm researching her husband John Joseph Heath who died in the Battle of the Somme in 1916, while serving with the Birmingham Pals.
She went on to remarry, becoming Harriet WHITEHOUSE.  Her son, my grandad Charlie Heath wrote this letter to my Mom before he died which triggered my interest. He had just read Kathleen Dayus' famous book 'All My Days':
Grandads letter
"I was born in 1911, and my father was killed in that war, in the Battle of the Somme in 1916. My mother was left with 5 children: Auntie Kay, Uncle George, Uncle Bill, Uncle Tommy, and of course myself (age 5). (She re-married later as you know) So you can imagine the hard times being with us the same as Kathleen Dayus the author depicts - they certainly were! We as a family never went Hop-picking - thank God! But we knew of it and many families in our area were quite familiar with the proceedings related to it. I do remember, bread and lard, and bread and dripping and fish and chips for 3d. We used to get a penny on a Monday and 2d on a Saturday from our Mother's pension, and run anyone's errands for a few coppers. With the 2d on a Saturday we used to go to the afternoon matinee at Winson Green Picture Palace and we used to think it wonderful and terrifically exciting as kids, but if we spent any of the 2d we'd had it, couldn't go in. I remember crying on one occasion, because I'd bought a pennyworth of shrimps, and one of my DAD'S army mates gave me 2d to go in."
Simon Fielding   simonharveyfielding@yahoo.co.uk  

 

TOP