NORTON STREET

NORTON STREET

                                    Photo of the OLD BRADFORDS BAKERY  BUILDING IN  NORTON STREET.

photo of the                        OLD BRADFORDS BAKERY  BUILDING IN          NORTON STREET.

photo of the                        OLD BRADFORDS BAKERY  BUILDING IN          NORTON STREET.

There was an Off Licence on the corner of Norton Street and Lodge Road, useful for getting your fags whilst waiting for the 96 bus, town one way the green the other.  Part way down on the right hand side of Norton Street is Coveley Grove, built on the site of the old Norton Street School.  Most of the children of the area went first to Benson Road Infants School where most confusingly the books were stamped Norton Street School.  The street  had a bridge that crossed a railway line, when crossed was Bradfords bakery with the smell of baking bread everywhere. Fresh hot bread could be bought from the bakery after 10pm on Sunday evenings. From an early age many local youngsters,  starting at 5-30am on a Saturday morning, I helped one of the bread van delivery drivers on rounds all over Birmingham, finishing after 9-00pm for seven and sixpence.
by Ted Rudge

06/06/07   Another short story involving people,and a building in Norton Street,we both mentioned Bradfords bakery of the days of our youth and the delivery of bread. My story is when I grown in to manhood,1954 I worked with my brother Fred delivering McDougalls Flour, we would load our lorries from the Railway Goods yard in Pickford St.the other Drivers was Wally Bannister,Ronnie Haywood,Ronnie Dubberly,and we deliverd to shops.school canteens,factory canteens, and other places were flour was used.in the Midlands. Mc Dougalls decided to mill flour in Birmingham, so they purchased the Bradfords Bakery building and converted it into a flour proccessing and packing plant,and distribution centre. The company sent three employies from Millwall Docks London,to install all the machinery required for the plant to opperate. They then Advertised for local woman for the proccess and packing,and after a two weeks trainning,they were up and running. The locals that worked there,a happy go lucky bunce of people,the company provide a first classcanteen,that was staffed by cooks Eva & Dasiy first class food.and at xmas time we wood trim the canteen with buntings and ballons,and I would take my recored player and everbody would bring their favourite to play on it,and we all had a
good time,this was after we had plenty to drink at the Railway Inn across the road. The Company where good to work for,every year they paid for annual dayout,the paid for a coach to take us all to London,and a vist to company head offices,and a great miday Luncheon. and a few hours to veiw round the big city We were taken by coach By Local Coach & Driver Mr.Tommy Harper. All the drivers talking about were shall we go when Mr.Tony.McDougall,ask were are you going lads and said into the city,ok said jump in to his car,it was open top convertible we climb aboard and lordit into the city smoke cigars. Then in the Evening we had another meal,then taken to the London Palladium to see a show called talk of the Town.  After thanking the McDougall Family and Directors of the company for a great day out, we started our journey home,half fell a sleep with exhaustion those that still standing sang all the way home. a good day out and paid wages for the day.
Ted the people from our area were happy go lucky Folk. I hope there are people whom took part in this day
out read this story on your Web Site.Colin Mills E-mail cmills9@blueyonder.co.uk

'THE RAILWAY' CORNER NORTON STREET (LEFT) AND PARK ROAD

NORTON STREET       I lived at no.18 from 1954 - 1962 and remember having a friend called Yvonne Adcock who lived across the street. We went to Benson Road School together. There was a pub virtually on the corner of every street then. A park called "The Rec"  (short for Recreation Ground) I think was in Musgrave Road. My Mom and Dad grew up in the same street, Perrot Street, and went to Foundry Road School. They were born in 1920/22. My Dad lived at No. 1  with his Mom, Elsie Simmonds my dad worked on the Railway all his life, working with the horses, delivering, and then being a lorry driver to manager. He worked at all the local stations, Hockley, Curzon Street, etc. Delivering goods to the market and Bulpitts (Swan Brand). My Mom came from a family of 7 who lived a few doors up from Dad in Perrot Street  mom's maiden name was Goode and she had sisters, named, Marjorie, Olive, Jess and May and apparently had two brothers, but they died very young. Mom's dad, Fred Goode, was the driver on the illuminated tram and also use to play football. I remember scattering his ashes around the goalpost at Villa Park Football Ground back in the early 60s.
I will be looking through the family album and no doubt will come across many an old photo or two of Winson Green.
by Jackie Clarke nee Simmonds.   09/06/02
 

TOP