WINSON STREET

BROOKFIELD GARAGE WINSON STREET

WINSON STREET 16/12/09

                                        VE DAY 1945 WINSON STREET

My Mother , Brenda (nee Morris) Humphries has these  photos that I thought you would like for your web site. They were taken in Winson Street during the VE Day street party celebrations in 1945. My mother, Brenda is sitting on the right at the end of the table. My Grandmother, Ada Morris is the lady standing on the right, holding the jugs. And the lady standing on the left, wearing glasses and holding a cake is Mrs Phillips who ran a Grocers shop in Winson Street opposite my grandfathers house (10 Winson Street the Boot Repairers). John "Jack" Morris was the Boot Repairer.

                                              VE DAY 1945 WINSON STREET

                                              VE DAY 1945 WINSON STREET

This photo, is a group photo taken in front of some houses in Winson Street. My Grandmother Ada Morris is standing on the far right next to the Gentleman in uniform and still holding them two jugs.  All the best Ted, Great Web Site. Gary Humphries     GHumph4846@aol.com

WINSON STREET 14/03/2012   My grandparents Richard John Moore (Jack) and Florence (Floss) lived in 3 Williams Buildings Winson Street next door but one from The Bellfield Inn with my mother Valerie and her sisters Pat, Eileen, Joan and brother John. The house was later demolished and used as a transport yard for my Grandfathers business G & M Transport.
My mother Val, the youngest of the Moore children is sitting (see group photo above right ) in the front row 5th from the right also sitting in the front row second from the left, resting his left arm on his knee and touching his ear with his right arm is my uncle John Moore. My Gran Floss is standing in the back row to the right of the man wearing a beret with his tunic open in a v neck. My Aunts Joan and Eileen are standing to the left and under the man standing on the window sill. My Aunt Pat is sitting in the second row 2nd from the right next to a child shading there eyes with their hand. My gran used to accompany Jack on his lorry and would leave her son John with Ada Morris (holding the two jugs) to look after him while she was away, during this time Mrs Morris taught him to knit much to his chagrin and the amusement of his sisters. I am sure many people will remember my grandfather Jack Moore as he had a telephone installed in the house for the transport business and many a time there would be a knock on the door and a friendly face asking if they could use the phone.
As a young lad in the 1960’s I have a lot of fond memories of visiting my Grandparents at 27 Winson Street they referred to Winson Street as the ‘Horse Street’ during this time they had moved into No 27 on the opposite side of the street from 3 Williams Buildings. I would often be given a thruppenny bit and run to ‘Finches’ to buy sweets as I ran out the front door the words of my gran would ring in my ears ‘Mind the horse road and make sure it’s a Milky Way so as not to spoil your tea.’
We would play in the transport yard formerly Williams Building with old tyres and planks of wood making hidey holes. The old underground air raid shelter was still in place that would have served 3 Williams Buildings and I remember my gran telling me how she took shelter there with my aunts and uncle when a bomb exploded nearby in Cape Street . She explained that the ground shook so hard and made such a noise that they were terrified. They were convinced when they came out of the shelter their house in Winson Street would be demolished and them homeless but in the event they only suffered broken windows.  

                                        Frankie Bass and Jack Moore

                                        Frankie Bass and Jack Moore

This picture above circa 1925 shows my Grandfather Jack Moore (Right) sitting on a BSA motorcycle alongside Frankie Bass. My parents still have my Grandfather’s hackney carriage licence from when he first set up business as a motorcycle side car taxi ferrying passengers from New Street Station. I also note in the picture of the tug-o-war that Frankie Bass is the first man on the rope right of picture. I am sure my aunts who were older than my mother could remember more and have lots of photographs that could be added to your site, I will see what I can arrange.

TUG OF WAR FRANKIE BASS ON THE END (RIGHT)

TUG OF WAR FRANKIE BASS ON THE END (RIGHT)

As a point of interest I spent a very interesting hour using skype and video chat to go through the photos with my mother who now lives in Florida for part of the year.
Kind regards            Mark McDermott    cabletail@btinternet.com

WINSON STREET 20/01/06                                                                                                                                                                    
Excellent, I moved to Winson Street when I was four in 1966 and lived there until it was all bulldozed. I remember playing on the bomb pecks sad but fun at the time.  Keep up the good work.                                                                                                                                                 John 80 Winson Street.  John Carew  jc012b4104@blueyonder.co.uk

WINSON STREET 08/11/04                                                                                                                                                             After looking at the photos of Winson Street many memories some good some not so good come to mind. At the age of 5 my mother and my brother and I moved to Winson Street in 1965, we lived at no9 right next door to the Yorkshire Grey pub we used to go to the Grove Cinema on Saturday mornings. and I also did odd jobs for Mr Austins son at his greengrocers shop, I was paid 2 shilings a week. "good times" ray elliker   raygun72@hotmail.com     

WINSON STREET and around  04/07/03
There are lots of memories, growing up in a close knit community of family and friends.
My Grandparents, Harry & Fanny Doe lived at 49 Winson Street all their married lives. Both being local they were married in St Cuthberts Church. Grandad's father, James Doe, was a master builder and built the stone archway that used to be the entrance to M&B brewery, opposite Grove Lane. Nearly all grandad's brothers and sisters lived, in the area, not only Winson Street, but Molliett Street & Heath Street. For the first 6 months of my life I lived with my parents at my maternal Grandmother's house, 15 Bewdley Villas, Cape Street. Moving around the corner we went to live with my father's Aunt and Uncle, Emily & George Tuffley, at 45 Winson Street, later when I was 8 years of age , we moved to 47 Winson Street. I lived in Winson Street until I was 18  (1969) when my parents left to open a hotel in Cliftonville. My Dad Denis Doe, who sadly died 9 years ago, was the youngest of three, Lily, who, at 92, is still alive, never married, worked all her life at GKN, in Heath Street, Harry, who died about 14 years ago, he too worked all his life at GKN. Dad worked at GKN until the 1960s then went to work at Lucas in Warstone Lane. Dad went to Dudley Road and Barford Road Schools, was in the Church lads brigade, Boys Brigade, St John Ambulance , before joining the army in time for DDay. He had fond memories of a childhood spent in and around The Green, in Summerfield Park, and the Reservoir. He was a butchers boy for Cheshire's on Dudley Road. He spent the night of the Coventry Blitz with the St John Ambulance, administering first aid in Coventry.
Although the GKN lorries would drive up and down the road, it was perfectly safe to play in the street, hardly anyone had cars in the 1950s, so you could play ball games and stretch a washing line across the road for skipping games. I can remeber as a little girl sitting on the front doorstep at dinnertime, waiting for my Dad to walk up the street from GKN ( or "Nettlefolds" as everyone new it ) for his dinner, about 12-30pm , there would be dozens and dozens of people walking up the road, at the start of their lunch hour, going home or going up to the shops on Dudley Road, most who passed by would have a word or a smile.

MOM, ME and DAD at a GKN sports day

My Mum, Olive Fallon, was born in Abbey Street, one of 4 children, James, now in his 80s, Doris, who died 20 years ago, my Mum and June who died 15 years ago. Their parents were Clara and Jim Fallon. Mum often talks about the evenings they spent in the courtyard in Abbey Street, when Grandad would play the banjo or the mandolin, whilst everyone danced and sang.

          FOX TROTT BAND

          FOX TROTT BAND

Photos My Grandad Fallon's family were all very talented, painters, musicians, my Grandad, played banjo mandolin and piano. One of his brothers Horace is shown here playing the banjo with his brother in law, Len Roberts playing drums, in a dance band, in the 1920s Mum went to Benson Road and Handsworth New Road Schools. Life for them changed when my Grandad died in 1936, they moved to Cape Street. During the war years Mum and her sisters would spend time with their Aunt, Ivy Roberts, who had a Drapers and Haberdashery Shop in Booth Street, they would help her in the shop which was always busy, because of workers passing up and down to the factories, Aunty Ivy had the shop, in the 1930s and up to the end of the 1940s. Mum worked at Cannings in Warstone Lane, she had various jobs when I was small, working in the Scribons cake factory in Smethwick and then in the 1960s working at D.F.Taylors off The Parade.
I went to City Road Infants School, Dudley Road Junior School and after passing my 11+ I went to Lordswood Grammer Technical School. The "family local" was the Bellfield in Winson Street (still there today thanks to a preservation order)
Grandad, dad and his brother were all members of the Gun Club, Grandad was a member of the RAOB ( the Buffs) from the 1920 until he died in 1971, Dad became a member in the 1960s....."The Bell" as it is known locally was the centre, for all local social events, weddings, engagements, birthdays and whenever the family got together, the men would always excuse themselves and retire to "The Bell" I have lots of memories of my childhood,  we would go off to Summerfield Park or Edgbaston Reservoir, by ourselves no adults, we were safe, sometimes as a treat we would go to Littwoods Park, where there was a paddling pool, even Warley Woods .....Days out would be to Dudley Zoo or the Science Museum in town. Sometimes I would get to go to London with Granny Fallon, on a train, to visit my Uncle.  The shops on Dudley Road, everything you needed in one small area, Cheshires & Marsh & Baxter Butchers, Austins the cooked meat, bacon and grocery shop, 2 big green grocers, news agents, post office, Glovers the clothes shop and drapers, the big furniture shop down by the Grove Cinema, whose name escapes me and many more, all the shop keepers knew you and you knew them. You hardly ever needed to go into town, in fact a trip to town was a real treat. You had a choice of 2 buses into town, B82 or theMidland Red B83
In Winson Street, we had several small shops, Finches the baker and grocer, there was a bakehouse at the back of the shop and Mr Finch made all his own bread and cakes.....mmm, next door but one to Finches, was Morrells the sweet shop, run by little old Mrs Morrell, just the other side of the entry at 53 was Wilson's, later Fields, grocers and general bits and pieces. There was another grocers down on the corner of Tudor Street and the opposite side of Winson Street to that was a greengrocers. As children we would be sent on erands to get bits of shopping from these shops.
Linda Daniels (nee DOE) Email: fromevale@btinternet.com

BELLFIELD INN,  WINSON STREET 1920  MORE BELLFIELD INN PHOTOS ON THE PUBS PAGE

BELLFIELD INN,  WINSON STREET 1920  MORE BELLFIELD INN PHOTOS ON THE PUBS PAGE

WINSON STREET   THE BELLFIELD   23/03/08        Congratulations on a well put together site. Writing from afar (Sydney, Australia) I was delighted to read stories of and see photos of the Bellfield Inn. To my surprise a couple of the photos published have images of my Great Great Grand Father Len Hyde and his wife May. My Great (x2) Grand Father was the publican at the Bellfield in the early 1900's till he died in 1932. His daughter May went on to live in South Africa where in her 80's she recites tales of the Bellfield and growing up in the 1920's. I would appreciate any feed back especially information that relates to the Bellfield Inn and its current state today. I would also like to know where the photo of the Gun Club back in the 1920's was taken. Best regards, Len Hyde  lhyde@sebelfurniture.com

WINSON STREET  13/05/03
Winson Street is where my Grandparents lived also my Gt/Grandparents lived in Moilliett Street, my mother was born in Chiswell Rd in 1896 her name was Adelaide Whitehouse. thank you  Pearl Carter  Email: teaern@aol.com

WINSON STREET
I started life at 141 Winson Street, Winson Green. During an air raid in May 1943. An air-raid Warden was posted outside to protect us from the bombs that were raining down, I'm glad to tell you he did a wonderful job.
Michael J Spittle

WINSON STREET 01/03/05
Does anyone have  have any photographs of  Winson Street Coronation Party (Stone Building) please.
Nigel Somers   Email: somersnigel@aol.com

WINSON STREET                                                                                                   CORONATION STREET PARTY 1953  (Thank's to Pauline Joseph for supplying these photos)

More WINSON STREET 1953 Coronation party photos  06/08/03

The 1953 Coronation Street Party, the Bellfield pub being the focal point of the festivities, all the children were given commemorative bibles, I still have mine.  If anyone would like names of people in the photos I will gladly try to help if they wish to contact me. Linda Daniels nee Doe           fromevale@btinternet.com

 

                   WINSON STREET  1953 Coronation Party

                   WINSON STREET  1953 Coronation Party

WINSON STREET
These photos show the street parties held in Winson Street for the Jubilee of King George V and Queen Mary and the Coronation of King George VI

Silver Jubilee Party 1935 o/s No 43       Linda Daniels nee Doe fromevale@btinternet.com

 

1936    Winson Street Party  and  1937 o/s No 49 Winson Street    Linda Daniels (nee DOE) Email:fromevale@btinternet.com

 

 

 

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